webdev

Conjunctured First Anniversary Party Video

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Conjunctured Co-Working, 1309 E 7th Street, Austin, TX celebrated their first anniversary with a party on Saturday, August 14, 2009. This is the video taken by @springnet at the party, it’s about 38 minutes long and their are shorter versions available on youtube, metacafe, etc.

You can also see this full video on MySpace, Metacafe, Blip.tv and Veoh

Or you can see shorter episodes at YouTube, Yahoo, MySpace, Metacafe, DailyMotion, Blip.tv and Veoh

Jon Lebkowsky at OneWebDay Austin

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Jon Lebkowsky takes us on a trip down Internet memory lane and recalls how a couple of guys from the Farm in Tennessee (fig and tex) – who I know well – landed at Stewart Brands Whole Earth Catalog in Sausalito and started the WELL (Whole Earth ‘Lectronic Link) which turned out to be a seminal incubating ground for many of the ideas of the modern day Internet. He also traces the beginnings of blogging with BoingBoing and fringeware in Austin, Texas. It’s a fascinating story about the beginnings and evolution of blogging and social networking. This event was a special jelly coworking event at Cafe Caffeine in Austin, Texas on Monday, September 22, 2008. Maggie Duval was a chief instigator of this event (http://livelyhoods.com)

Darren Kitchen – hak5

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Online Videos by Veoh.com

open door64 and what do you find?

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The hottest tech site in Austin right now is

 Door64

It’s up to the second with information on events and stimulating forums.

Some guy named Matt does it.

I’m on it.

new streaming lifecast on justin.tv/austintexas

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Watch austintexas live video and chat on Justin.tv

We’re live streaming with a show on justin.tv/austintexas now.

We’re working with Redbud Sports in Austin, Texas and the plans are to bring you many athletes and sports events around Austin. Also, you can see our feed at austincast.com

TwitThis for your blog

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What is TwitThis?



TwitThis

Click “TwitThis” to try it out and tell your friends about us on Twitter!

TwitThis is an easy way for people to send Twitter messages about your blog post or website. When visitors to your website click on the TwitThis button or link, it takes the URL of the webpage and creates a shorter URL using TinyURL. Then visitors can send this shortened URL and a description of the web page to all of their friends on Twitter.



 

 

 

So I think I’ll install this on this blog and my other blogs:

austincast.com/blog

spring.net/blog

touroftexas.com/blog

and

searchslides.com/blog

I’ll let you know how hard or easy this was.  I run on WordPress.

Given the powerful reach of the internet should political campaigns be required to disclose youtube negative ads?  – Pat Buchanon

“let it rest” – Eleanor Clift

“the internet is being transformed into a toilet” – McLaughlin

Twitter Support

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Twitter.com

Twitter, says the official website is a “ Whole World in Your Hands”

What is twitter?

“Twitter is a community of friends and strangers from around the world sending updates about moments in their lives. Friends near or far can use Twitter to remain somewhat close while far away. Curious people can make friends. Bloggers can use it as a mini-blogging tool. Developers can use the API to make Twitter tools of their own.”

Ok… so how does it work?

“You can send updates in three ways: send a text message from your mobile phone, type a message from the Twitter site, or instant message from Jabber or Gmail chat. (support for AIM and other chat services coming soon!) Start by texting the word help to 40404 if you’re in the United States. For international folks, we have different numbers. Write us and we’ll give you yours.”

I heard about twitter from Cote on his drunkandretired podcast.

You can see the twitter plugin on the lower right column of the austincast blog.

Twitter Support.

Web 2.0 Toolbar

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Here’s a plugin for both IE and Firefox that I recommend highly – ptw

From the faq at http://web20toolbar.com

What is the Web 2.0 Toolbar?

It’s a small plugin for your browser that contains all of the most popular content from the web 2.0 sphere in one spot…your browser. The best Social Bookmarking, Pictures, Videos and News all one click away.

Does it Work With IE, FireFox & Flock?

Yes – for FireFox & IE…It does not work with Flock (working on it…love Flock) and I have not tried it on other browsers. Check back ofter to see the updates.

How do I “SUBMIT IT” to My Digg, Del.Icio.us or other social linking site?

When you are on a page you like, just click the “SUBMIT IT” button on the toolbar and select the link site you have an account for…you need your own account on each site to use this. I have also inlcuded the “Onlywire” link that will allow you to post to multiple sites at one time.

Where do I get it?

Right here, Right now (Baby). The Web 2.0 toolbar is a small app that resides in your browser – simply install it and go.

Web2.0Slides | Web2.0 Slideshow

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What is it?  It’s the second generation of our slides project.

Web2.0Slides is a self-running slide show of over 1,400 of the best Web2.0 sites. It’s categorized by tags and sorted alphabetically.

What’s cool about it? You can click on any site in the left-hand column to pause the slide show and surf around. When you’re done, simply click PLAY, and it will begin right where you left off. Perfect for Web 2.0 couch ‘taters. But if you’re antsy and want to click around on sites, go right ahead—it won’t stop the show.

Web2.0Slides | Web2.0 Slideshow.

jkanstyle » Actual lessons from Kiko

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This is a direct quote from the kiko blog of Justin Kan

Actual lessons from Kiko
August 17th, 2006 | Category: Uncategorized

Today I listed the main asset of our startup, our web calendar Kiko, on eBay (see the auction). Since we put the eBay post up, there has been much buzz on techcrunch, reddit, etc about Kiko going under. Many people have speculated heavily on why we failed, and, to my amusement, some have even blogged about lessons we can learn from Kiko.

I think there are a lot of lessons other people can take away from Kiko. Most of these are things that someone looking in from the outside wouldn’t know. They don’t have a lot to do with our business model. They don’t have a lot to do with getting stepped on by a giant. Here are the important things that I actually learned from my first startup:

1. Stay Focused. Most entrepreneurs have lots of ideas. Often times, many of them may be really good. I don’t know about you, but my favorite part about startups is talking about new products and new business ideas. If you’re a creative person, it’s very easy to get side-tracked on side ideas when you really should be working on your main one. This is bad. Bad, bad, bad. We did this a lot with Kiko, and it caused many delays in getting the product out the door.
2. Hire Slow, Fire Fast. Picking the right people is life and death for your company. We hired two people for Kiko. One of them (Rich White, our interface designer) was awesome; everything I could have asked for and more: self motivated, entrepreneurial, competant, hard working, and very smart. However, one of our hires turned out to be a huge mistake: he basically spun his wheels, didn’t complete anything, and left for months at a time without word. Working with someone like this can easily make working on your company not very fun at all. If you have any reservations about someone at the outset, you should probably not hire them.
3. Cute hacks can cost you time. Take the time to do things right from the beginning. Seriously.
4. Make an environment where you will be productive. Working from home can be convenient, but often times will be much less productive than a separate space. Also its a good idea to have separate spaces so you’ll have some work/life balance.
5. Get your investors involved. Your investors are there to help you. Get them involved from the start, and don’t be afraid to ask for help. I think we made the mistake early on of trying to do (and know) everything ourselves, perhaps out of insecurity over being so new to the business world. This is a mistake.
6. Build incrementally. We tried to build the ultimate AJAX calendar all at once. It took a long time. We could have done it piece by piece. Nuff said.

An AJAX calendar is not fundamentally a bad idea (I think we, google calendar, 30boxes, calendar hub, and many others prove that). I don’t think we were doomed from the beginning; I just think we were too slow at times, and focused on the wrong thing at times. I think Kiko is still a good idea that can yield a lot of value to its users, but I won’t be the one to take it there.

I’ve had a good time working on Kiko this past year. It’s been a lot of fun and I’ve gotten a lot of experience I wouldn’t trade for anything. Y Combinator has also been a great funding experience, and helped us out tremendously; I am thankful to be part of that community. Thanks to everyone who has reached out to wish Emmett, Rich and I luck.

P.S. We’re looking for good hackers. Email me at justin.kan at gmail.

jkanstyle » Actual lessons from Kiko.

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